Saints and Blesseds

Think you know the Lay Dominicans? Let us give you a very brief introduction (or perhaps a refresher) to a very small selection of our most beloved saints and blesseds:

Bl. Margaret of Castello (1287-1320)– Born blind with spinal deformities and dwarfism, adopted, experienced vivid visions especially during recitation of the Rosary, miracle-worker, joyful witness to the love of Christ

St. Catherine of Siena (1347-1380)– Patroness of Lay Dominicans, mystic visionary, influencer during the Avignon papacy, secret stigmatist, Doctor of the Church

St. Martin de Porres (1579-1639)– Mixed-race heritage from Peru, miracle-worker, friend to animals, pious and austere

St. Rose of Lima (1586- 1617)– First canonized Saint of the New World, mystic, austere (and sometimes severe) penitent, intercessor for the missions

St. Louis de Montfort (1673-1716)– Author of “True Devotion to Mary,” promoter of devotion to the Rosary, founder of The Missionaries of the Company of Mary and the Daughters of Wisdom  

Bl. Pier Giorgio Frassati (1901-1925)– The Man of Eight Beatitudes, athlete, member of St. Vincent de Paul and Catholic Action labor movement, died through acute polio contracted by charitable visits with the poor

Featured Member Profiles

So what does the life of a Lay Dominican look like today? Meet some of our current members of the Province of St. Joseph!

Name: John
Fraternity Number: #405
Stage of Formation: Life Professed
State of Life: Married
Profession: Electrical Engineer/Lead Technologist/Retired
Religious Name: Joseph
Do you have a favorite Dominican Saint?: St. Albert the Great. He was a great scientist, loved learning and had a very strong devotion to the Blessed Mother
Why do you think Lay Dominicans are needed today?: The Church very much needs people outside of the Religious who are willing to step forward and express their rationale for following Christ and the teaching of his Church
Tell us about your personal apostolate. Specifically, how is preaching involved?
For the past 8 years I was a Court Appointed Special Advocate for children who were in the foster care system. This apostolate allowed me to show the children that it was possible for them to be loved in spite of their circumstances. I also lead a small faith-sharing group at my church, and am a hospice volunteer where I sit with patients and be Christ’s presence to them.
What do you like about your Dominican community?: The openness to express their love of God, how they share their faith, their study and how God is present in their lives.

Name: Walter
Fraternity Number: #101

Stage of Formation: Life Professed

State of Life: Married

Profession: Small Business Owner
Religious Name: Michael

Why did you choose your religious name?: Because we have a duty to fight evil

Do you have a favorite Dominican Saint?: St. Peter of Verona, because he gave his life for the Faith. 

What is the hardest part about being a Lay Dominican? Being a member of a community; there’s no isolation. 

What is the most joyful or rewarding part about being a Lay Dominican? Being a member of a community; there’s no isolation!

Tell us about your personal apostolate. Specifically, how is preaching involved? Every interaction with the general public is an opportunity to instruct. 

ann

Name: Ann
Fraternity Number: #106
Stage of Formation: Life Professed
State of Life: Single
Profession: Chaplain
Do you have a favorite Dominican Saint? I love Bl. Giuseppe Girotti, a Dominican priest who was born in Alba, Italy. He dedicated his life to the teaching of Scripture. Esteemed for his vast learning, he loved to exercise his priestly ministry among the poor and lonely, especially at the hospice of the elderly. He was imprisoned by the Nazis at Dachau, and shared the Word of God freely and joyfully with the other inmates until his death in 1945. He’s my favorite because of his love of the elderly and charity in action.
Can you tell us about your personal apostolate? I am a part-time chaplain at the state hospital, where I work with prisoners, the mentally challenged, etc. I also work at a nursing home, where I preach through my visits and prayer services. I also do what I call “quiet preaching” by sitting with a resident who may be hours away from meeting God. I have many conversations with residents who carry guilt with them, or who don’t have a relationship with God. Some haven’t been to church in many years.
What is one piece of advice you’d give to someone discerning this vocation? This is not a church group– it is a vocation not to be taken lightly. At times there is sacrifice, and at times there is great joy. Be sure this is what God is calling you to become, and if you are called then give yourself to it fully every day of your life.